Our Response to the Covid-19 Pandemic

There are many types of viruses, and one of them is the coronavirus. In biology in general ‘corona’ is a word used to describe body parts resembling a crown which is how coronaviruses got their name their bodies are round with pointy structures all over. Although common among animals, coronaviruses that can infect humans are fairly rare.

It is unclear which animal-borne coronavirus resulted in the coronavirus currently related to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there were near perfect resemblances with the samples taken from horseshoe bats (80%) and pangolins (92%). The coronavirus causing the pandemic has most likely developed in a combination with an immune system response, meaning it is unlikely the virus had been created in a laboratory. The true origins of the virus, however, are still debatable, much like the true identity of patient zero.

It is, but that is not its usual transmission route. Primarily, the coronavirus spreads through infected aerosolised droplets (when a person sneezes, coughs, talks, etc.). However, in some experiments it has been found that the virus can in fact stay alive in air for a certain period of time, making airborne transmission possible.

The known symptoms of COVID-19 are:
· fever
· cough
· tiredness
· loss of smell or taste
· breathing difficulties
· nausea
· vomiting
· diarrhoea
· headaches
· a runny nose
· sore throat

According to the current information available, the duration of the illness depends on its severity. For mild cases it usually takes two to three weeks to return to normal health, while in more severe cases it can take six weeks or more.

When an infected person is symptomatic, there are viral traces present in tiny droplets of their coughs and sneezes. Whenever they cough, sneeze, or even talk, the viral particles end up around them – remaining in an aerosolised form or ending up in the air, on surfaces or objects. When a healthy person touches the contaminated surfaces or objects, and then any of the orifices on their face (mouth, nostrils, even tear ducts!) the virus enters their organism. A person can also simply inhale the virus when being around an infected person. This is why the most important preventive measures are mask-wearing and hand washing.

Because the virus is new there isn’t yet enough longitudinal research on its long-term consequences on human organisms. However, it is evident that the virus is more often fatal the older the person is. In addition, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and existence of previous underlying conditions are all factors that can make the risk of dying higher. Some researchers have attempted to calculate the fatality rate of the virus, and depending on the region it varies from 0.6 to 1%. This suggests that one person out of 100 infected usually dies from the virus.

Although the number of people who reported they have been re-infected is on the rise, there is not yet conclusive proof of that and these reports are largely anecdotal. However, many researchers warn that completely dismissing the possibility of re-infection is unwise, especially because it is still unclear how long the antibodies created for the purpose of fighting off the coronavirus last. According to a British study, the number of antibodies significantly lowers after 2-3 months, and according to an American study the antibodies were stable three months after the symptoms originally started. Neither of the articles has been peer-reviewed for now.

The best way to prevent becoming infected with the coronavirus is to find out how it spreads, wash or santise your hands and your environment regularly, avoid touching your face (mouth, nose, eyes), wear a mask when around others, and keep your distance.

The first known cases of COVID-19 appeared late in 2019. On December 31st, there was a media statement issued by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission mentioning ‘viral pneumonia’ cases on their website. The first reported death from the novel coronavirus happened on January 11th. The first case of the disease outside of China was reported in Thailand on January 13th. On 30th January, the WHO’s Director-General issued a declaration about the outbreak being a PHEIC – a public health emergency of international concern. 

It is unclear how the virus came to be, but there are some educated guesses. It is unlikely that the virus had been genetically engineered in a laboratory, since it most likely developed in a combination with an immune system response. Coronaviruses usually spread from animals to humans, and this is also most probably what happened in the case of the novel coronavirus that caused the outbreak. The most likely animals from which the virus was transferred onto humans are bats, followed by pangolins.

A person can get infected when being in close contact with an infected person, since the respiratory droplets could enter their organism accidentally while the infected person talks, coughs, or sneezes. It is also possible to get infected when touching a contaminated object or surface, which is why regular hand-washing is highly advised.

How long coronavirus survives on a surface depends on the material.

material

how long the viral presence lasts

Metal

5 days

Wood

4 days

Plastics

2 to 3 days

Stainless steel

2 to 3 days

Cardboard

24 hours

Copper

4 hours

Aluminium

2 to 8 hours 

Glass

up to 5 days

Ceramics

5 days

Paper

varies (a few minutes to up to 5 days)

 

Your treatment will vary depending on the symptoms you have. If you have a fever, it is generally advised to rest, drink a lot of fluids (water, tea), and take paracetamol or ibuprofen if you feel like it. If you have a cough, don’t lie on your back and take a teaspoon of honey. If you are feeling out of air, get in a comfortable position and consciously take long deep breaths. If you have more severe symptoms or the symptoms persist, contact a medical professional.

Although the vaccine for coronavirus is underway, there is currently no cure for it. There have been reports about the vaccine’s progress, placing its potential availability on the market somewhere between late fall of 2020 and 2021.

Because the virus is new there isn’t yet enough longitudinal research on its long-term consequences on human organisms. However, it is evident that the virus is more often fatal the older the person is. In addition, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and existence of previous underlying conditions are all factors that can make the risk of dying higher. Some researchers have attempted to calculate the fatality rate of the virus, and depending on the region it varies from 0.6 to 1%. This suggests that one person out of 100 infected usually dies from the virus.

Yes. Although flu and COVID-19 share some symptoms (cough, fever, tiredness, body aches, etc) there are also some differences between them, main one being that although flu shots exist and are widely implemented, there is currently no cure for COVID-19. There is also no national immunity to COVID-19, and we know much less about it and about its potential for re-infection. The novel coronavirus is also 10 times more deadly than the H1N1 swine flu strain, and spreads more easily with longer-lasting symptoms. As far as symptoms go, runny nose is practically never present in COVID-19 infections, while it’s one of the most common symptoms of flu, while the reverse is true for the loss of smell or taste.  

There are two ways to test for COVID-19. The first method tests for traces of a current infection (in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients), while the other tests for indications of a past infection. The first method, the so-called swab or viral tests, looks for the presence of viral RNA. The second way of testing for an infection is by getting a blood or an antibody test. This test searches for the antibodies responsible for fighting off a COVID-19 infection. The presence of such antibodies would also indicate the prior presence of an infection.

The coronaviruses got their name because of the appearance of their body surface. In biology in general ‘corona’ is a word used to describe body parts resembling a crown which is how coronaviruses got their name  their bodies are round with pointy structures all over.

According to WHO, the SARS coronavirus’s infectivity was significantly reduced at56°C per 15 minutes. Due to the similarities between the SARS coronavirus and the novel coronavirus, it was considered that the findings were applicable to it as well. However, the newest research (not peer-reviewed) suggests that the novel coronavirus might be able to survive even these conditions. According to a recent study, the reduction in infectivity was noticeable only after 15 minutes of the virus being exposed to 92°C.

Our Covid-19 Products

Our gloves, gowns, masks, foot covers, and other PPE are made of durable and comfortable materials that will significantly minimise the risk of infection.

Each coronavirus test kit we offer is a reliable indicator of a current or a past COVID-19 infection.

Mobile Clinic &
Hospital Solutions

Refuse to compromise reach any patient quickly and provide them with the excellent care they deserve.

mobile clinic, a large white rectangular trailer that can be transported via truck. It is placed in places where there are no hospitals in the immediate vicinity. Black door with all its equipment as a small ambulance